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Choosing the right worktop for your kitchen

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Household trends are always changing and this is no different when it comes to your kitchen worktop.

As such, granite saw a resurgence around 15 years ago and until recently, was the material many homeowners chose for their own worktop.

With plenty of options to choose when it comes to your kitchen worktop, let’s take a look at the more popular solutions on the market.

From granite to caeserstone and marble to wood, you’re sure to find the perfect worktop for your kitchen.


Granite

As mentioned, granite came through leaps and bounds 15 years ago and it’s predicted there’ll be resurgence for this material. It’s easy to see why too, as it’s hard and durable, whilst being scratch resistant. Perfect for any kitchen. It’s a family friendly material and you can further protect it by resealing once a year.

In terms of the price you’d expect to pay, it will vary significantly depending on the quality of material you opt for. For instance, prices range from just £60 per square foot to around £245 per square foot. This would depend on factors such as the colour, finish and country it’s sourced from.

Granite worktop
Image from pinterest

CaeserStone

Granite can be expensive, so you may want to find an alternative which has many of the same benefits whilst being a little cheaper. And this is what you get with CaeserStone. This material is a mixture of at least 90% granite, marble and quartz. This gives you a stone effect that’s smooth and scratch resistant. It’s hard and durable too, whilst the non-porous qualities ensure water doesn’t sink into the worktop.

CaeserStone is a low maintenance option and with prices from £25-92 per square foot, you can see it’s much cheaper than the popular granite. Of course, there is a downside, which is that the surface isn’t heat proof. Hot saucepans can’t be directly placed onto the worktop which could prove a problem, but not one that can’t be solved.

caeserstone worktop
Image from pinterest

Marble

Marble is another popular option because of its decorative and aesthetically appealing look. It’s also a popular choice for bathrooms. Perhaps marble’s biggest problem it holding up well for years to come. It will offer you less protection from general wear and tear, but because it’s a softer material it can be polished to remove blemishes.

Unfortunately it will be affected by acidic products and can easily be scratched. This can be dealt with by using chopping boards and ensuring the surface is protected when in use, so it will ultimately depend on your preference. Marble, like granite, can be expensive too, starting from around £60 per square foot and increasing to £245 per square foot.

Marble worktop
Image from pinterest

Wood

It’s not just those shiny surfaces which are chosen in the kitchen as well, and wood is a perfectly suitable option. Of course, this material brings a rustic appeal to the kitchen, creating a homely space for when you’re preparing food.

Like other wooden products, the original colour can be lost by regular contact with soap and water. The surface can also be damaged by spills and scratches and could do with resealing to keep it protected. In terms of cost, you’d be looking at something similar to CaeserStone, but with a completely different appeal.

Wood worktop
Image from pinterest

Essentially, with the kitchen worktop the decision will come done to what qualities are most important for you. Every material has its weaknesses and whether you opt for aesthetic appeal, cost or durability, you’re sure to have a finish you’re delighted with.

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Tom Crosswell

I have been managing online projects since 1999 and I'm a experienced marketeer, who is well versed in international brand management, online business strategy and developing long term relationships. Through my academic and professional background I am a specialist in generating online loyalty towards brands. My experience has taught me that ultimately business is about relationships and people. For more information see my Google+ page.